Posts Tagged ‘Landisworks’

Studio

Visit an artist studio!

Fall is the season of artists’ Studio Tours. It gives each artist an opportunity to show his/her artistic productivity for the first three quarters of the year.  (Yes, some artists do have quarterly action plans!)  This is your opportunity to see them in their own creative environment where “the action” happens.    Studio Tours are a special event for both the artists and their visitors!

There are a few things you, as a potential customer, need to know before starting out.  Here’s my twenty tips for approaching (and enjoying) an Artist Studio Tour:

1)  Ask a friend or partner (if they like art) to join you.  NEVER ask someone to go with you that doesn’t enjoy or appreciate art.  You’ll end up back home before you know it and you won’t enjoy yourself.  Make it a special event with a kindred spirit.

2) Usually Studio Tours have maps printed so that you can pick and choose the studios that peak your curiosity.  Review the list and choose those that reflect your interest. Try to visit as many of these as possible.

3) Don’t limit yourself from the full experience.  If it’s a two day affair, try to go both days.  If a studio has an art medium you are not familiar with, check it out!  You will learn something!

4) Start in the morning, break for lunch at a local restaurant to get a feel of the “local color”.  Try to imagine being an artist in this area.  What would be the artist’s local inspiration?  After lunch, keep going.  Visit more studios.

5) Most studio stops will have some sort of beverage to keep you hydrated but it’s a good idea to bring water and a snack item.

6)  Some private art studios have bathrooms but don’t count on them being available to the public.  When in need, it’s best to ask the artist where the nearest “public” restroom is and they will either offer you their private bathroom or direct you to a nearby public location.

7) Wear layered clothes so you can be comfortable if the weather changes quickly.  However, do not lay down purses or clothing in the studios.  The artists will not be responsible for the theft of your personal belongings.

8) Studio Tours are designed for adults. Responsible teens are welcome but parents “beware”!  Teens like to buy! Bring extra  funds.

9) Toddlers are an artist’ worst nightmare when they want to “touch everything”!  Art and creative products take many hours to make and are typically not designed for children.  So, if you plan to bring a child, keep “the little ones” in a stroller or under your strict control.  The artists will thank you.

10) Stay in the central area of the studio.  Don’t wander around looking inside other rooms or walking around the artist’s property.  If they are comfortable with you, they may ask to take you on a tour of other areas.  Be aware that some art studios are a part of the artist’s actual home.  It’s their private space or sanctuary.  Don’t invade their privacy.

11)  Bring cash for impulse shopping but be aware that most artists accept credit cards as well for more expensive items.  However, they may ask for your name, address, telephone number, etc. to complete the transaction.  Don’t expect debit card sales.  Do ask, “Do you accept credit cards?”

12)  Don’t rush in and out.  Ask each artist to describe their art-making process.  Don’t feel like you will be offending them by questioning their process.  Ask how they got started making art and their motivations.  Most artists love to demonstrate and talk about their art.

13) If you like the artist’s work, get his/her business card and any literature for potential later commission work.  Artists make most of their money from commissions of private works.  Don’t be afraid to ask.

14)  If you love a piece of art but think it’s a bit too pricey, ask if the artist will reduce the asking price by 10%.  Requesting more of a discount typically is an awkward situation.  Most artists have already reduced their prices since there is no overhead when they are selling the item themselves and in their own studio.  Further reductions could be interpreted as an insult.  It’s not cool.  Just don’t do it.

15)  Ask if the artist has a “lay-a-way plan”.  Some artists will allow a buyer to make monthly payments with a limited term and contract.  However, should the buyer not be able to meet the deadline, all prior payments are lost.  Remember, artists make their money by having their works available for sale.  Lay-a-ways take the art off the market and interfere with potential sales and gallery or exhibit events.

16)  Expect to pay taxes on all sales (cash, personal checks, and credit cards).  Sales taxes vary by city, county and state.   Some artists will forgo charging customer’s taxes.  This is your discount! But the professional artist still has to pay taxes.

17) The artist may have a visitor/customer sign-in sheet.  If you feel comfortable with the artist and their environment, don’t hesitate to share your address and email.  Most artists use this information strictly for the future marketing of their own art and private sales/gallery events.  If you like their art, sign up!  By doing this, you may also get significant future discounts. (On the other hand, if you do not feel comfortable with the artist, don’t hesitate to say “I don’t share my personal information” and walk away.)

18)  Think holiday-shopping!!!  Buy now for Christmas and Hannukah!  Art makes great presents. It allows the receiving person to reflect on the piece and see it through their own eyes.  It’s a gift that keeps on giving too.  Compliments are forever.

19)  If you get home after visiting several studios and you can’t stop thinking about a specific artist or item that you bypassed because you wanted to “hit” other studios before buying, give the artist a call to request a private sale or “re-look”.  Typically, the artist will be happy to invite you back.  However, it’s usually not cool to “drop in” at an artist’s private studio unless they have regular business hours.

20) Most importantly, have fun!  Take your time.  And tell your friends about the sale if it’s a two-day event!  Encourage them to visit the tour too.

FYI: This weekend, November 7 & 8th from 9am-4pm each day,  the Artists of the Superstitions (a mountain range located near Apache Junction and Gold Canyon, Arizona) is hosting their Annual Studio Tour.  I’d love to see you at my Landisworks Studio.  My studio is typically a disaster with art & jewelry supplies everywhere!  I’m a messy  abstract painter & jeweler.  However, I do clean it at least twice a year for open studio sales!!!!  Come for a visit.  For a detailed map of our Studio Tour go to http://www.artistsofthesuperstitions.com

Yes,  I do commissions!  In fact,  painting for others is the primary way I sell my artwork.  I always start from photographs.  I prefer taking the photos myself but when a client has a special memory related to their own private photos, I will do my best to create a painting that reflects the energy and personality of the subject(s).  Frequently, clients will want a Landisworks painted portrait from a wedding, anniversary, vacation, or another special event that  yearns for more drama that only paintings can inspire.  My pointillism style is popular because “no one has Pointillism Portraits!”

I thought I would share some of my favorites.

Consider a Landisworks Pointillism Painting for your home or office.  They make great gifts too.

Email landis@landisworks.com

B & W Photo

B & W Photo

Completed Portrait

Completed Portrait

Pet Photo

Pet Photo

Completed Pet Portrait

Completed Pet Portrait

Original Photo

Original Photo

Completed Landscape

Completed Landscape

Original Photo

Original Photo

Completed Portrait

Completed Portrait

Altered Photo

Altered Photo

Snow Grazing  24 x 36"

Completed Pet Portrait

Last night I attended a soiree at the Pinetop Contemporary Fine Art Gallery where I have a number of my pointillism landscapes exhibited.  The gallery’s Friday Night Culture Club opens it’s doors to local musicians, poets, actors, etc. to entertain the crowd of creativity enthusiasts.  As I was wandering a bit, introducing myself to other attendees before the entertainment started,  a man approached me saying, “Oh you’re the artist!  You’re the reason I’m here!”  (I had an article in the local paper just that day describing my paintings).  He said, “Who would have thought?  Pointillism in Pinetop (AZ)!”  He was quite engaging.  It turns out that he himself is also an artist.  He was enthusiastic about his artwork which is always fun to hear.  We spoke of how artists market themselves today so I shared with him that I use the LinkedIn Social Network.  He exclaimed “So do I!”  Our conversation immediately turned to just “LinkedIn”…  www.linkedin.com

This was the first time I actually met someone “new and in person” affiliated with LinkedIn.  We discussed how I use it to promote my art to galleries.  It has allowed me to exchange ideas with art dealers and other artists all over the world.  Just this week, I conversed with people from New York, San Francisco, London, Argentina, the Netherlands, and more.  He laughed and said, “My son was one of the original people using LinkedIn.   He encouraged me to try it too.”

LinkedIn is designed as a competitive environment.  You make connections with people as you exchange thoughts.  Your number of connections can either promote more connections and/or readers, as well as, a lack of connections can dissuade others from reviewing your profile and taking you seriously.  So you have to keep building connections.   I also read & respond to the discussions of various  LinkedIn Professional Groups I’ve joined.  I am frequently motivated to “move” on ideas they promote.  I have done more to market myself since LinkedIn than I ever would have imagined prior to joining.  The Pointillism Painters Group on LinkedIn was my brainchild.  It currently has a meager four members of pointillism artists whose works are diverse but I anticipate many more will surface, and soon!  I also read what my actual “real-life friends” are doing on LinkedIn.  They motivate me to action too.  I want to stay “up on what’s happening” and not let others pass me by;  thus, the competition.  It’s healthy though!

So, when my new “Soiree LinkedIn Friend” said “I haven’t spent enough time on My Profile“, I knew he needed some motivation to get the most out of LinkedIn.  It’s obvious that he also knows the competitive nature of this social network.  Thus, the implied apology…  So, this whole blog is for “you”.  I’m glad we met in person and I hope to “connect on LinkedIn” in the future.  Good luck!

Wanted to share an article in today’s local paper.

http://www.wmicentral.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=20329941&BRD=2264&PAG=461&dept_id=509345&rfi=6

The Pointillism Painters Group Logo

The Pointillism Painters Group Logo

Today, I started a social networking group on LinkedIn (www.linkedin.com) called The Pointillism Painters Group.  If you are an artist and not familiar with LinkedIn, I highly suggest that you take a look at it and become a professional member.  There are a number of art related networking groups that allow you to participate or start a discussion about a pertinent topic.  You can also promote your artwork and get feedback on your finished products. LinkedIn has brought plenty of activity & interest to my website.

I began the pointillism group to hear from others about their individual processes whether physically, emotionally &/or  spiritually.  I can not wait to hear how other artists benefit (or not) from painting in pointillism.  I plan to share my process from start to finish and hopefully, much of this information can inspire a published book on pointillism.

Agua Azul  36 x 48"  2160.00

Agua Azul 36 x 48" 2160.00

Artists Wanted is a collaborative project between several New York City artists and creative organizations working to build new lasting opportunities for emerging talent.   (Like me!) They have experienced first hand the difficulties in breaking into the professional art world and it is their mission to make this process more welcoming, dynamic and open-ended.   They recently opened up their gallery to include non-NYC artists in the Art vs. Design Project.

Currently, they are observing a New American Art Boom; with art being sold at records rates, new artists quickly acquiring international fame and dynamic new artistic directions being explored.   However, Artists Wanted also believe many of the best new artists remain undiscovered.   Their job is to get emerging artists’ works seen in the most powerful way possible.  Therefore, I submitted this image representing one of my most recent works.  Wish me luck.

Portions of this Blog are quoted directly from their website.

City Boy Elvis   Vinyl Record   250.00

City Boy Elvis Vinyl Record 250.00

If you are near Long Island City this Friday, check out my Elvis paintings on vinyl records at APW Gallery, www.apwarts.com. The exhibit “Art on Record Volume II” will have it’s opening reception from 6-9pm.   Each of my Elvis paintings are priced at only $250!  Wow!  Check them out.   It should  be a great exhibit!